Posts Tagged Care and Wear

What is a PICC Line and What is it Used For?

By Chat Razdan, Co-Founder and CEO of Care+Wear

We often get asked, what is a PICC line? Why is it important? So many people wonder why we created Care+Wear and what our products do to help patients. I wanted to write this blog post to share a bit more on PICC lines and what our PICC line covers do.

I am always glad to share more on the topic. Often times, patients are given a PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter) line to help access the blood stream. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters refer to the fact the catheter is placed peripherally (in an arm vein) with the tip of the catheter located centrally, as in a central vein in the body.  Access to the blood stream is required for a number of treatments including treatments for Cancer, Diabetes, Lyme Disease and TPN (total parenteral nutrition). PICC lines allow patients to receive IV treatments such as antibiotics, chemotherapy and pain medications.

To get a little more technical…a PICC line is inserted in a peripheral vein in the arm, like the cephalic vein, basilic vein or brachial vein, and then advanced proximally toward the heart through increasingly larger veins, until the tip rests in the distalsuperior vena cava or cavoatrial junction.

PICC lines are usually inserted by physicians, physician assistants (in the US), radiologist assistants (in the US,) respiratory therapists, nurse practitioners, or specially trained certified registered nurses like vascular access nurses and radiologic technologists using ultrasound, chest radiographs, and fluoroscopy to aid in their insertion and to confirm the placement of the line.

PICC Catheter diagram

PICC Catheter diagram

The insertable portion of a PICC varies from 25 to 60 cm in length, that being adequate to reach the desired tip position in most patients. Some lines are designed to be trimmed to the desired length before insertion; others are simply inserted to the needed depth with the excess left outside.

PICC lines can remain in position for extended periods of time, from several days to years on end.

They are used for both in patient and out-patient scenarios. The versatility of PICC lines has led to their increased use (e.g., administering antibiotics, drawing blood/blood transfusions, chemotherapy, prolonged IV antibiotic treatment, and TPN nutrition). In fact, over 6 million patients have a PICC line installed annually and that number continues to increase every year!

Before using a PICC line, it is important to understand the key benefits and risks!

What are some of the benefits of using a PICC line?

  • A PICC is more comfortable compared with the many “needle sticks” that would have been needed for giving medications and drawing blood. The goal is to spare your veins from these frequent “needle sticks.”
  • A PICC can also spare your veins and blood vessels from the irritating effects of IV medications.
  • A PICC can be used in the hospital setting, nursing facility, or at home and can stay in place for weeks, months or years if needed.
  • A PICC can be used for many types of IV treatments.
  • A PICC can be used to draw blood for the majority of blood tests.

There are a number of risks of using a PICC line.

  • There may be slight discomfort during the procedure.
  • Bleeding may occur at the insertion site.
  • Leakage can occur due to skin elasticity, outward line migration, or line rupture.
  • It is sometimes necessary to attempt the PICC line placement more than once and it may not be possible to insert the entire length of the PICC.
  • During insertion of a PICC, accidental puncture of an artery, nerve, or tendon can occur near the insertion site. However, this is a rare event.
  • A clot may form around the catheter in the vein (thrombosis), which can cause swelling and pain in the arm.
  • Inflammation in a vein (phlebitis) can develop from the use of all types of IVs, including PICCs.
  • An infection may occur at the insertion site or in the bloodstream. An estimated 8-25% of all PICC lines that are installed become infected and can lead to complications and increased mortality rates.
  • The PICC can come out, partially or completely, if not well-secured and completely covered.
  • The PICC can move out of position in the vein and may need to be removed or repositioned.
  • The PICC may become blocked. Medication may need to be used to clear it.
PICC Cover - Care & Wear

PICC Cover – Care & Wear

If you have a PICC line, you want to watch for several signs, including:

  • Swelling, redness, red streaking, hot or hard area in PICC line arm
  • Pain in PICC line arm
  • Fever or chills
  • Swelling of the hand, arm and/ or neck on the same side as the PICC line.
  • Leaking of fluid when you flush the catheter

Call your healthcare provider or PICC line care provider right away if you notice these signs or if you are worried or concerned.

We created the Care+Wear Ultra-Soft PICC line cover to help patients who have a PICC line. Our PICC line covers are made of anti-microbial fabric, are machine washable, and provide a unique, breathable mesh window to allow air circulation over the PICC line and visibility to the insertion site. Our PICC line covers help eliminate some of the challenges of having a PICC line by making it easier to securely and healthily cover the line without having to worry about exposure to outside agents or low quality materials. Let’s get back to living!

Interested in learning more? Here’s some other links as well.

Feel free to check out our website at www.careandwear.com and join our community as we help patients get back to living their lives!

About the Author:

Chat Razdan is the Co-Founder and CEO of Care+Wear. They started Care+Wear after having friends and family diagnosed with cancer and told to wear tube socks on their arms. They felt that there was an incredible opportunity to help patients get back to living their lives.

Chat is a proud University of Virginia alum with an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business who spent time as a strategy consultant at A.T. Kearney and as an investment banker at Goldman Sachs. Nicknamed “Smiley” in middle school basketball camp, he has tried to bring a smile wherever he goes. A die-hard Baltimore fan, he continues to cheer for the Orioles and Ravens and can often be found running up the West Side Highway in the mornings. In his spare time, he helps to plan his class reunions for UVA and Booth and serves on young alumni boards for UVA

 

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