Archive for January, 2014

Exercises for Cancer Survivors – A New Book

by Carol Michaels, MBA, ACSM, ACE

Exercise is an important component of a cancer survivor’s recovery process. Emerging research suggests a decrease in breast cancer recurrence for those who exercise. A well-designed program can also decrease side effects and improve quality of life. Moreover, acceptance of exercise as part of a good recuperation and standard of care has been gaining momentum in the medical community.

Cancer patients should begin an exercise program designed to ameliorate the adverse effects of surgery and help them regain their pre-cancer fitness level. Exercise that focuses on functional fitness will help them be able to perform the activities of daily living and return to the activities that they enjoy.

Cancer survivors have questions about exercise. Which exercises should I be doing and which should I avoid? Can I exercise during chemotherapy? Can I exercise if I have lymphedema? How do I exercise safely with osteoporosis? Some cancer patients will need to exercise under supervision while others will be able to exercise independently. The type and scope of cancer and the overall medical condition and fitness level of a cancer survivor will determine whether or not a supervised program is needed. This book, Exercises for Cancer Survivors- Stretching and Strength Training, will be an essential guide for those who prefer or need to exercise independently.

 

Exercises for Cancer Survivors book

Exercises for Cancer Patients

For those who do not live near a major city, it might be difficult to find a therapist who has experience working with cancer patients. This book provides cancer survivors with access to fitness tools specifically created for their needs. It can also be a valuable tool for those who cannot afford health care, or are unable to leave their house. Exercise is a simple and affordable treatment.

I have taken my Recovery Fitness® exercise program and created this book to help you. You should use the exercises in this book as a guide to building an individualized routine that works and feels right for you.

This book will teach you how to prevent injury. Cancer survivors need to be patient; returning to your pre-cancer fitness level takes time and cannot be rushed. You will learn the implications of your particular surgery and the corrective exercises needed to improve recovery. Recovery Fitness Exercises for Cancer Survivors is a great way for cancer survivors to learn stretching and strength training exercises.

 

Carol Michaels, MBA, ACSM, ACE, has been a fitness professional for more than 18 years and is the founder and creator of Recovery Fitness®, a cancer exercise program.  She owns and operates Carol Michaels Fitness and Recovery Fitness and is a consultant, author, speaker, Pilates instructor, and cancer exercise specialist. She is on the advisory board of Living Beyond Breast Cancer and other cancer organizations, and has appeared on health related television programs.  The American Council on Exercise recognized Carol as a Trainer to Watch in 2011 and Personal Fitness Professional honored her as the 2012 PFP Trainer of the Year.  Carol developed and produced two DVD’s called Recovery Fitness Cancer Exercise-Simple Stretches and Recovery Fitness-Strength Training.  Both DVD’s can be found on her websites www.carolmichaelsfitness.com and www.recoveryfitness.net. Her new book, Exercise for Cancer Survivors, is a fantastic resource for anyone undergoing cancer surgery or treatments. Click here to order the book on Amazon.  The book can also be purchased on www.carolmichaelsfitness.com.

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Donate Your Data – Share your Cancer Story to Help Yourself While Helping Others

By Sarah Stanley

A decade ago, Internet entrepreneur Marty Tenenbaum was diagnosed with melanoma. He visited several local oncologists, but each doctor recommended a different treatment strategy. With no clear solution, he decided to enroll in a clinical trial that was testing a melanoma vaccine.

The vaccine failed the trial. But, for reasons unknown, it saved Tenenbaum’s life.

Inspired by the difficulty of navigating his options, and the need for better ways to figure out which treatments will work for which patients, Tenenbaum founded Cancer Commons—the first & only open access nonprofit collecting and learning from real patient experiences to give patients the information they need.

Please watch this short video to learn more about Donating Your Data

 

 

 

“Everyone who has been diagnosed with cancer has felt the fright and anguish of having to make life and death decisions without adequate information, data, or time,” Tenenbaum says. “I vowed to do something to spare patients from this agony.”

To support this mission, Cancer Commons has now launched its new Donate Your Data (DYD) Program, an online registry that empowers people with cancer to anonymously share their cancer experiences to advance research and, in return, inform their own clinical care.

Through DYD, each patient records and updates information about his or her cancer experience in a private profile. This information may include stage, treatments, molecular test results, treatment responses, side effects, and more. All data will be de-identified and made freely available, giving doctors, researchers, and patients themselves an unprecedented resource to determine the best approaches to cancer care, according to each patient’s unique clinical history.

 

Donate Your Data Dashboards from Cancer Commons

Donate Your Data Dashboards from Cancer Commons

Based on the data they provide, patients receive customized news feeds and alerts to relevant clinical studies and trials, reports on any research that uses their data, and notifications concerning important research findings, all delivered through each patient’s personal DYD dashboard. Each patient can graphically track his or her cancer journey on a timeline, and will be able to selectively share it with physicians and other patients.

 

 

 

 

 

DYD does not focus solely on figuring out which treatments are most effective at shrinking or eradicating tumors for which patients. DYD aims to capture information on how patients approach every aspect of their cancer journey—including dealing with side effects and overall well-being—so that patients can learn from similar patients about what might work best for them.

For now, DYD is available only to lung cancer and melanoma patients, but Cancer Commons will soon be expanding to cover most cancers. If you have or have had melanoma or lung cancer, please consider joining Cancer Commons in making the dream of personalized cancer treatment a reality for everyone. Donate Your Data now.

For more information, visit http://www.cancercommons.org. Follow Cancer Commons on Facebook and Twitter.

Sarah Stanley is Associate Editor at Cancer Commons, where she helps translate cancer research into useful insights for patients.

 

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